GARDENING and GARDENS

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IMAGE IS OF ONE OF SEVERAL HALF GALLON JARS OF BEAUTIFUL MULTI COLORED MIXED DRIED BEANS MY GARDEN PRODUCED THIS YEAR.  YOU CAN CLICK TO ENLARGE  THE PIC 

Damn, but I love to garden. All during my working life, my twelve to sixteen hour days and frequent travel made it difficult to be able to have a garden.

During several years in New Mexico, near to ……………….

…………………………..El Paso, Texas and the Mexican city of Jaurez, I tried several times to have a garden.

You could plant early there, starting in March, but by the end of March the desert spring winds, of constant 20 to 50 MPH, would start and totally dessicate any plant not native to the desert.

Unless you were growing mesquite, yucca or cactus, the winds would wipe your garden out, unless you covered it with clear plastic or straw to hold the moisture in. And, that was after paying a water bill to have irrigated in the first place. The spring winds lasted until around the first of June.

Then when the wind stopped blowing, veritable hordes of Jack Rabbits showed up to eat anything green, that had survived the winds. In theory chicken wire fencing could keep the Jack rabbits out of your garden, but it never worked for me, the rabbits always  got over or under my fencing. \

By the first of July, any garden plants not devoured by the wind or rabbits had to face day after day of 100 degree F temps for a a couple of months. Except for tomato plants, which thrived in the heat, but were always eaten by tomato worms. The tomato worms in the desert are amazing. You can go out fifty miles from nowhere in the middle of the desert and try to cultivate tomato plants, and within a few days, tomato worms would appear out thin air to gnaw them to the ground. And, as far as I know, tomato plants are the only food tomato worms eat. How they find your tomato plants, and what they do to survive until they do find them is a great mystery to me. 

So, trying to garden in the desert Southwest, was a tough hustle.

A major reason, I moved back to Posey County when I retired, was so I could garden. And gardening  is wonderful here, even for crippled old bastards like me. I can’t bend or stoop any more, because when I do, my damaged lungs can’t get air, and I have to fight for breath. But I can garden here. Pretty much any seed you drop on the ground and stomp your foot on will take rood and grow here. My stepson tills for me, when I need it, but I have found some things, such as climbing squash and climbing beans, don’t care if they are surrounded by weeds and crab grass. They just put down a root, then grow vertically up the trellises I provide for them. So, I grew a bumper crop of dried beans and winter squash this year.

I also grow sweet potatoes in containers. Like the beans and winter squash, I grew enough sweet potatoes to  last until next season, with out ever needing to bend or squat.  That’s quite a few sweet potatoes, because, for health reasons, we never eat Irish potatoes, only sweet potatoes. And we have sweet potatoes several times per week, just like many people have Irish potatoes.

I also have an apple tree, a peach tree, two cherry trees, two pecan trees, a hickon tree, two pear trees, two plum trees, an apricot tree, a long row of thornless blackberries and a patch of raspberries. I grow lettuce and leafy greens in containers and have horse radish plants in several places. We also grow our own onions and garlic. We dry and freeze the fruits and berries and make our own horse radish sauce from the roots of our horse radish plants.

Not bad for a crippled old bastard, huh?

HERE ARE MNY BEAUTIFUL BEANS AGAIN 

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